A Quiet Kind of Thunder – Review

img_8166-editedThe other day my friend and I were browsing through the book shop. Since that morning we were talking about being the “quiet” ones – just normal introvert talk, if you know what I mean. Then all of a sudden my friend said “Look!” and pointed to that pretty pinkish-golden book cover with the white writing: A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard. What were the odds of us finding a book with “quiet” in the title? I picked it up and read the blurb. I was immediately intrigued by the storyline and decided to buy it right then and there – as was my friend. I couldn’t wait to start with this book because the plot seemed so different than any other book I’ve read. And no, it’s not “another introvert book” if that’s what you’re thinking. It is a young adult novel about Rhys and Steffi who couldn’t be more different, yet they were so alike: Rhys is deaf and Steffi doesn’t talk. Perfect, you think? Nope, it all just got a whole lot more complicated. Continue reading “A Quiet Kind of Thunder – Review”

My Name is Memory – Review

my-name-is-memoryDo you know what may be the best thing in modern society?  Logging off Facebook and using every moment you would pick up your phone, to pick up a book instead.  Not an e-reader, a real book.  The solitude and quiet resetting of myself has been much-needed and so welcomed.  Let’s be honest, I already know what is going on in the world.  I don’t need Facebook to tell me, with a dash of hostility and a pinch of bickering.

With my newfound free-time, I decided to check out a copy of My Name is Memory by Ann Brashares from the library in town, based on the recommendation of author Faith Andrews.  Ann Brashares is the author of The Traveling Pants series, as many of you may already know.  I grew through my early teenage years with the “Pants” books, so I already trusted Brashares to bring me a story I would love. Continue reading “My Name is Memory – Review”

Dark Hearts – Review

dark-hearts-ebook-coverNovalee Clarke is a loner at heart: she always was and she always will be – or so she thought. But since becoming close friends with Jace Kensington – a loner at heart himself – she notices that things begin to change. Instead of keeping to herself, she reaches out to Jace. Nova slowly but steady begins to open up and tells him things she has never told anyone before. Jace sees her – the real her. It’s easy being herself around him for once and not thinking about her past. But as Jace and Nova’s feelings to one another become stronger, Nova’s past catches up with her. Will Jace be able to overcome his own demons to be there for Nova?

“The Light in the Dark”-series started off on a rather tragic and real note with Rae of Sunshine. When Stars Collide was lighter and fun. With Dark Hearts, Micalea Smeltzer created a powerful and strong third novel. Continue reading “Dark Hearts – Review”

Tell Me Where it Hurts – Review

Let me tell you where it hurts, it hurts within the pages of this short book of poetry.  I’ve never rushed to write a review as quickly as I needed to with this book.  It begged to be written while the emotions were still fresh.  JR Rogue should be proud of Tell Me Where it Hurts. From the moment of reading her dedication, I knew I was going to love this book: “For the Caged Birds.  If I can sing, so can you.”  It evokes emotions I had buried and most times would rather forget. I, too, was once a caged bird. I’ve never had tears in my eyes reading poetry before, perhaps because some of these words hit me on such a personal level.  There is often so much unnecessary pain in childhood, even more if the child’s innocence is not nurtured. My heart hurt reading these poems.  It hurt for the struggles I’ve been through, but mostly, it hurt for the author.  Poems with this much raw sadness and heartbreak can only be written from personal experience.  You have to know pain to write pain. For that, I am saddened. Continue reading “Tell Me Where it Hurts – Review”

Matched – Review

img_7965editedWhat happens when the society controls every aspect of your life: where you work, who you love, how many children you have, when you die.
Cassia lives in a society like that. On her seventeenth birthday she is about to meet her Match: her perfect partner in life – chosen by the Society. While she is happy with the Society’s decision at first, she can’t help but fall in love with someone else: someone who is not even eligible to be matched, according to the Society. And that is when she starts to question their motives and rules. As both try to hide their feelings from the Society and their friends, Cassia tries to fight for independence to make her own decisions and choices. But what happens when the Society is always a step a ahead of you? Continue reading “Matched – Review”