The Siren – Review

IMG_9791editedThere were actually two reasons I bought this book last year in England: the first one was the cover. I know, “Don’t judge a book by its cover!” but I couldn’t leave Waterstones without buying this book. The second and much smaller reason was Kiera Cass, the author of this book. You probably all know her from The Selection series. I read book one in that series and wasn’t too impressed to be perfectly honest. I know that a lot of you guys loved The Selection series but it wasn’t for me. I wanted to give Kiera another chance and the blurb sounded interesting enough.

Kahlen has been a Siren for almost a century. She and her sisters live as much of a secluded life as possible and barely interact with humans. But then one day Kahlen meets the guy of her dreams and everything changes in both their lives. Continue reading “The Siren – Review”

It’s Always the Husband – Review

It’s Always the Husband was a page flippin’ contradiction for me. There were parts I loved and thought were clever and parts I hated. My feelings were similar to the traits and relationships of the characters themselves.
Aubrey, Kate, and Jenny come from different worlds, placed together as roommates in their first year of college. Looking forward to new starts and the best years of their lives, the trio forms an unlikely friendship despite the odds being against them. One girl is poor as dirt from the other side of the country, one is a middle class “townie” with high ambitions, and the other has friends in high places with the world bowing at her feet. The story switches perspectives from past perspective to present day, 20 years after the girls’ freshman year. It follows up with their married lives and their mysterious strained relationship from events happening in their early college days. As we delve into each character’s psyche at different times, we unearth new tidbits about their less than stellar friendship, despite the women still classifying themselves as best friends.  Continue reading “It’s Always the Husband – Review”

The Perfect Stranger – Review

I think I may have been at an advantage reading The Perfect Stranger as my first Megan Miranda book. The reviews for All the Missing Girls are raving, making fans wonder if The Perfect Stranger can live up to the hype. Since I have yet to read her previous works, I have no comparisons to effect my judgment. Ignorance is bliss in this case.

After a mysterious fiasco with her journalism career, Leah is forced to start over in a new place (Western Pennsylvania) with her long-time friend, Emmy, and in a new career as a teacher. When a girl is found by the lake near the girls’ house barely hanging onto life, Leah’s plans for a slower paced life are put on hold. Her journalistic instincts take hold, and she begins investigating the story. Shortly after, Leah realizes her flighty roommate hasn’t been home or seen for a few days and begins to worry she may be the subject of a similar vicious attack. Continue reading “The Perfect Stranger – Review”

The Red Hunter – Review

My first book by Lisa Unger sucked me in and wouldn’t let me go. I’ve had Ink and Bone on my TBR, even planning to read it earlier this month, but didn’t have the time to start it. I’m thrilled I was able to begin with The Red Hunter instead. This book will be sticking with me for a long time.

The story begins with two separate plots, seemingly unrelated, and two women (Zoey and Claudia) who have both faced their own horrors. One uses her past to fuel her drive for revenge and the other finds strength in sharing her history with the world through her blog. As the women work to come to terms with their traumas in their individual ways, simultaneously trying to uncover mysteries buried years ago, their paths diverge, forcing them to face the good and evil of the world head on.

From the get-go of this story, I was blown away with Unger’s writing. Her fingers type gold. There are writers and there are storytellers, and Lisa Unger is gifted in both facets. This story is layered with past perspectives, present moments, and alternating point of views, all seamlessly woven together to allow readers to feel thrilled, empathetic and maybe even worried for what the characters will face next. If the alternating perspectives seem confusing in the beginning, have no fear, it will all make sense in the end. Continue reading “The Red Hunter – Review”

Behind Closed Doors – Shared Review

ba-parisBehind Closed Doors is told from the perspective of Grace, a newlywed with the perfect marriage. Grace is the definition of the ideal wife- she hosts beautiful dinners with excellent food, she is perfectly doting and enamored with her husband, and she never lets on than that life is less than heavenly.  However, Grace is never seen sans her husband. She is frequently sick, rarely enjoys times with friends, and lives in a home with giant metal shutters covering the downstairs windows while her husband is away.  If that doesn’t raise red flags, I don’t know what would.  However, everyone in the couple’s life does not seem to question a thing Jack or Grace says or does.  They are perfect, after all.  Or are they? Continue reading “Behind Closed Doors – Shared Review”

Our Favorite Books of 2016

It has been a great year of reading, learning, and discovering new authors. We have fully immersed ourselves in the reading community, made new friends through it, and have had a wonderful year all thanks to the books we’ve grown to love.
And here is a list of our favorite books of 2016: Continue reading “Our Favorite Books of 2016”

The Girl on the Train – Shared Review

img_7067-updatedThe Girl on the Train is one of the biggest recent releases of the past two years and now a major motion picture to boot. It’s hard to believe this is the debut novel of Paula Hawkins since it hit almost instant fame.

The main character, Rachel, rides the same train everyday while observing the lives within the homes she passes. She begins to feel as if she knows the people she is passing, and creates romantic storylines for the people she sees most frequently. One day on Rachel’s regular train ride, she observes an appalling scene that wrecks the imaginative story she had fabricated for so long. When Rachel goes to the police to report the scene she observed as a helpful tip for an investigation, she is left feeling as if she did not seem like a credible witness. Instead of depending on the police, Rachel inserts herself into the lives of the strangers she watched through the windows of the train, determined to solve the mystery and make herself useful. This “who-done-it” story will keep readers guessing until the very end.  Will you be on Rachel’s side, or is she as crazy as everyone assumes? Continue reading “The Girl on the Train – Shared Review”