The Queen and the Cure – Review

“The Gifts we are given are not given for our benefit but for the benefit of mankind.”

Was Amy speaking of herself with this quote?  Seriously, the woman’s gift of writing is a benefit for mankind.  Every time I read one of her books I am in complete awe of her writing abilities.  She crafts such in depth stories and some of the most romantic scenes I have ever read.  To be honest, I’m not the biggest fantasy fan, but that does not stop me from snatching up Amy’s books as soon as they are released.  Whether I prefer the genre or not, I know I will be getting a beautiful story with some of the most incredible writing out there.  The Bird and the Sword was one of my favorite reads of 2016.

The Queen and the Cure picks up two years later where The Bird and the Sword left off, with Kjell’s story.

SYNOPSIS:

Kjell of Jeru had always known who he was. He’d never envied his brother or wanted to be king. He was the bastard son of the late King Zoltev and a servant girl, and the ignominy of his birth had never bothered him.

But there is more to a man than his parentage. More to a man than his blade, his size, or his skills, and all that Kjell once knew has shifted and changed. He is no longer simply Kjell of Jeru, a warrior defending the crown. Now he is a healer, one of the Gifted, and a man completely at odds with his power.

Called upon to rid the country of the last vestiges of the Volgar, Kjell stumbles upon a woman who has troubling glimpses of the future and no memory of the past. Armed with his unwanted gift and haunted by regret, Kjell becomes a reluctant savior, beset by old enemies and new expectations. With the woman by his side, Kjell embarks upon a journey where the greatest test may be finding the man she believes him to be.

Continue reading “The Queen and the Cure – Review”

The Perfect Stranger – Review

I think I may have been at an advantage reading The Perfect Stranger as my first Megan Miranda book. The reviews for All the Missing Girls are raving, making fans wonder if The Perfect Stranger can live up to the hype. Since I have yet to read her previous works, I have no comparisons to effect my judgment. Ignorance is bliss in this case.

After a mysterious fiasco with her journalism career, Leah is forced to start over in a new place (Western Pennsylvania) with her long-time friend, Emmy, and in a new career as a teacher. When a girl is found by the lake near the girls’ house barely hanging onto life, Leah’s plans for a slower paced life are put on hold. Her journalistic instincts take hold, and she begins investigating the story. Shortly after, Leah realizes her flighty roommate hasn’t been home or seen for a few days and begins to worry she may be the subject of a similar vicious attack. Continue reading “The Perfect Stranger – Review”

The Red Hunter – Review

My first book by Lisa Unger sucked me in and wouldn’t let me go. I’ve had Ink and Bone on my TBR, even planning to read it earlier this month, but didn’t have the time to start it. I’m thrilled I was able to begin with The Red Hunter instead. This book will be sticking with me for a long time.

The story begins with two separate plots, seemingly unrelated, and two women (Zoey and Claudia) who have both faced their own horrors. One uses her past to fuel her drive for revenge and the other finds strength in sharing her history with the world through her blog. As the women work to come to terms with their traumas in their individual ways, simultaneously trying to uncover mysteries buried years ago, their paths diverge, forcing them to face the good and evil of the world head on.

From the get-go of this story, I was blown away with Unger’s writing. Her fingers type gold. There are writers and there are storytellers, and Lisa Unger is gifted in both facets. This story is layered with past perspectives, present moments, and alternating point of views, all seamlessly woven together to allow readers to feel thrilled, empathetic and maybe even worried for what the characters will face next. If the alternating perspectives seem confusing in the beginning, have no fear, it will all make sense in the end. Continue reading “The Red Hunter – Review”

Preston’s Honor – Review

prestonshonorMia Sheridan can always be counted on to craft beautiful, intense love stories, and she does not disappoint with Preston’s Honor.  Out of the wonderful 17 books I’ve read in 2017 thus far, Preston’s Honor is my favorite.  I was drawn in from the first chapter, immediately making it a book I didn’t want to put down.  The times I had to do boring adult-y things, I was reliving every word of this story and dying to know what was going to come next. For me, Preston’s Honor is up there with Archer’s Voice as one of Mia’s greatest works, something not to be taken lightly.

Going in, I didn’t know a single detail about this story except for the Gemini connection as it is A Sign of Love novel, which made me suspect the story would feature twins. I was a little nervous there may be a love triangle involved, but my fears were unfounded.  I know Mia writes some of the most alluring novels I have ever read, so it was an easy decision to reach with grabby hands for her newest book.

One of the things that made this book so exemplary to me was being able to relate so personally to Annalia.  Her character came to life for me.  I felt so drawn to her, devastated for her, and proud of her at times.  The heart-breaks and desolation Lia felt throughout the story were described so vividly I felt as if I was there, feeling that pain, wanting to comfort her.  I despaired with her and shed empathetic tears for her through much of the novel.

“As it turned out, financial strife   even financial desperation    was much easier and more pleasant than emotional despair.”

The flashbacks leading up to present time, then merging together were one of my favorite aspects of reading.  I love a good back story, as it leads to a deeper connection for me with the characters.  I like to know the details that made them the “person” they are and to be able to see their growth in the present and future.  Another facet of this story I found surprisingly touching was Lia’s Mexican heritage and the grief her mother faced as an immigrant.  I enjoyed how Mia was able to weave this into the story so effortlessly, while being able to teach readers an important lesson in the process    simply, we are all human no matter where we come from.  I love that readers are able to get a look into two social classes melding together, to show how we really are the same deep down, despite the actions of some of the crappier characters (i.e. Alicia and Mrs. Sawyer) in the book.

Just like the last time I read a Mia Sheridan novel, I want to pick up everything she has ever written and completely binge on it.  She awakens emotions in me that have been dormant for years, and makes me cry over things I would never expect to freaking sob over.

This book is releasing in 3 short days!  I highly recommend 1-clicking this beautiful story.   Continue reading “Preston’s Honor – Review”

Mists of the Serengeti – Review

mistsMists of the Serengeti is not the typical book I would ditch my TBR pile for. However, after a friend gifted me this book and I saw the overwhelming number of positive reviews, I decided to jump in.  This book had everything I look for in a story– beautiful writing, plenty of emotions, educational moments, and love!  What more could a girl ask for?

“…we’re all connected in strange, mysterious ways.  Pull a thread here and a life unravels there.”

Normally, I find stories set in Africa outside of my realm of interest.  I’ve never been very inspired by African culture, environment, or history.  I’m happy to say, Mists of the Serengeti broadened my horizons in ways I wasn’t prepared for.  First, this novel completely caught me off guard by featuring albinism.  The strangest coincidence happened the day I started reading this book.  I was watching television with my husband and he pointed out an Albino basketball player in one of the games he was watching.  Later in the afternoon, he switched it to an episode of Cops (yes, interesting TV choices that day) where one of the police officers was an Albino man.  While I have personally seen a couple of people with albinism in my life, I had never given the condition much thought.  I started wondering what struggles people of African decent may face if their skin is white, and decided to start my own research. At this point, I had yet to reach the description of Scholastica walking out of the shadows in the story    my jaw was on the floor when I read it.  What are the chances of randomly seeing two people with albinism on TV, being curious about it and researching the subject, and then reading about it in a book all in the same day?  It’s not as if this is an everyday topic many of us come face-to-face with.  This odd bit of Kismet had me drawn to the story in an unforgettable way. Continue reading “Mists of the Serengeti – Review”

A Thousand Letters – Review

cover-ebook-atlStaci Hart‘s newest novel, A Thousand Letters, is unlike her previous releases. Whereas the “Bad Habits” series and the standalone “Wasted Words” have been on the fun side, A Thousand Letters was more angsty and emotional.
During one fateful night seven years ago, Elliott made the hardest decision of her life and changed not only hers but also Wade’s life forever. Without having talked or seen the other in all those years, sad cicumstances force Wade and Elliot back together. Having to deal with each other again is  not easy and neither of them knows how to act around the other anymore. He clearly has changed and Elliot is not the same she was seven years ago either. Can they start all over? Can they forgive the other for all the pain they have caused each other?

All Staci Hart books I’ve read so far are set in the most amzing city of the world: New York City and I freaking love it! Continue reading “A Thousand Letters – Review”

Anything You Can Do – Review

coverTo me, RS Grey is a genius. She can write about absolutely anything and it’s certainly going to be a success. Her previous works range from soccer and olympic romances, romantic holiday getaways in Italy and an epic roadtrip through Texas. With Anything You Can Do, Grey created another great novel that definitely will join her other successful ones. This book is not her first romantic comedy but the first one for me.
The story features Daisy and Lucas, nemeses ever since they were born. Now, at 28, they are both successful doctors and seize a chance in taking over a private practice in their hometown of Hamilton, Texas. As far as Daisy is concerned, Lucas is not part of the plan. She wants to take over the practice all by herself and is willing to do everything to make Lucas leave the practice and Hamilton for good. And Lucas? Well, he has his own little devious plan. Continue reading “Anything You Can Do – Review”