Atheists Who Kneel and Pray by Tarryn Fisher – Cover Reveal

Atheists.jpgTitle:  Atheists Who Kneel and Pray
Release Date:  TBD
Cover Design:  Ellie McLove of Love N. Books
Synopsis:
Yara Phillips is a wandering muse.
She dates men who need her, but always moves on to something new, never staying in one place for very long.
David Lisey is in need of a muse.
A talented musician lacking lyrical inspiration. When he first sees her, he knows he’s found what he’s been looking for.
Yara believes she can give David exactly what he needs to reach his full potential: A broken heart.
David’s religion is love.
Yara’s religion is heartache.
Neither is willing to surrender, but religion always requires sacrifice.Atheistssleeve.jpg

Are y’all freaking out like I am??? I can barely contain my excitement over this!  The title, the cover, the blurb, the TARRYN!! I love the anticipation of waiting for a new Tarryn Fisher release. Leave your guesses for the release date in the comments!!


Jumping around excitedly,

♥ Ashley

The Queen and the Cure – Review

“The Gifts we are given are not given for our benefit but for the benefit of mankind.”

Was Amy speaking of herself with this quote?  Seriously, the woman’s gift of writing is a benefit for mankind.  Every time I read one of her books I am in complete awe of her writing abilities.  She crafts such in depth stories and some of the most romantic scenes I have ever read.  To be honest, I’m not the biggest fantasy fan, but that does not stop me from snatching up Amy’s books as soon as they are released.  Whether I prefer the genre or not, I know I will be getting a beautiful story with some of the most incredible writing out there.  The Bird and the Sword was one of my favorite reads of 2016.

The Queen and the Cure picks up two years later where The Bird and the Sword left off, with Kjell’s story.

SYNOPSIS:

Kjell of Jeru had always known who he was. He’d never envied his brother or wanted to be king. He was the bastard son of the late King Zoltev and a servant girl, and the ignominy of his birth had never bothered him.

But there is more to a man than his parentage. More to a man than his blade, his size, or his skills, and all that Kjell once knew has shifted and changed. He is no longer simply Kjell of Jeru, a warrior defending the crown. Now he is a healer, one of the Gifted, and a man completely at odds with his power.

Called upon to rid the country of the last vestiges of the Volgar, Kjell stumbles upon a woman who has troubling glimpses of the future and no memory of the past. Armed with his unwanted gift and haunted by regret, Kjell becomes a reluctant savior, beset by old enemies and new expectations. With the woman by his side, Kjell embarks upon a journey where the greatest test may be finding the man she believes him to be.

Continue reading “The Queen and the Cure – Review”

The Foxe & The Hound by R.S. Grey – Cover Reveal

We are so excited to reveal the gorgeous cover of R.S. Grey’s next release, THE FOXE & THE HOUND! This romantic comedy releases June 1st. See the cover and find out more about THE FOXE & THE HOUND below!

 

About THE FOXE & THE HOUND

When your life is a hot mess at twenty, it’s cute. At twenty-seven…well, not so much.

It’s just that my lofty dreams—making it as a real estate agent, paying rent on time, showering daily—have stayed just that: dreams. Oh, and love? I’ve decided love might be a little ambitious for me at the moment. Instead, I’ve settled for the two guys who will never leave me: Ben & Jerry.

That is, until Dr. Adam Foxe takes up residence as the town’s new vet.

With his strong jaw, easy confidence, and form-fitting scrubs, it’s not long before every housewife in Hamilton is dragging neglected tomcats in for weekly checkups.

Like everyone else, I’m intrigued. Even after I spoil my chance at a good first impression, he still offers me a proposition I can’t refuse: play his girlfriend at a family function and he’ll hire me as his real estate agent. Welcome to love in the 21st century.

It’s too bad I underestimated Adam’s irresistible charm and the undeniable attraction that burns between us. The day he pins me to the wall and silences me with a kiss, the line between reality and ruse begins to blur. Every teasing touch brings me to my knees. Every kiss promises more.

It looks like my hot mess of a life is about to get a little hotter.

Add THE FOXE & THE HOUND to your Goodreads list here!

THE FOXE & THE HOUND releases June 1st – you’ll be able to preorder your copy for .99c starting May 29th!

Keep an eye on R.S. Grey’s Facebook page for the links!

About R.S. Grey

R.S. Grey is the USA Today bestselling author of thirteen novels, including THE FOXE & THE HOUND. She lives in Texas with her husband and two dogs, and can be found reading, binge-watching reality TV, or practicing yoga! Visit her at rsgrey.com

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It’s Always the Husband – Review

It’s Always the Husband was a page flippin’ contradiction for me. There were parts I loved and thought were clever and parts I hated. My feelings were similar to the traits and relationships of the characters themselves.
Aubrey, Kate, and Jenny come from different worlds, placed together as roommates in their first year of college. Looking forward to new starts and the best years of their lives, the trio forms an unlikely friendship despite the odds being against them. One girl is poor as dirt from the other side of the country, one is a middle class “townie” with high ambitions, and the other has friends in high places with the world bowing at her feet. The story switches perspectives from past perspective to present day, 20 years after the girls’ freshman year. It follows up with their married lives and their mysterious strained relationship from events happening in their early college days. As we delve into each character’s psyche at different times, we unearth new tidbits about their less than stellar friendship, despite the women still classifying themselves as best friends.  Continue reading “It’s Always the Husband – Review”

My History of Reading – Ashley

I remember the very first book I read by myself as a kid. I don’t recall the title, but I can still see the illustrations in my mind’s eye – clocks and animals with simple words. I read that book nothing short of a thousand times, feeling so proud of myself each time because I was able to read the book on my own. From the moment I could read by myself, I was hooked. Little did I know how much reading would mean to me as I aged. As an independent person, my ability to read is paramount to me learning new things about cooking, building objects, or simply to satisfy my curiosity on a certain subject.

Before I was able to read to myself, the best days were when teachers would read the Amelia Bedelia books, because they were hilarious to me. I loved seeing how Amelia would confuse things. The Frog and Toad books also filled me with much excitement. I enjoy reading them to my own children now.

Some of my favorite novels to read as a kid were those in a series, such as The Boxcar Children, Nancy Drew, Goosebumps, and The Baby-Sitters Club. I was always rushing off to the town or school libraries to check out the next book in the series, and read countless numbers of these books.

My favorite standalone book from childhood was a book I read in third grade, called Letters From Rifka by Karen Hesse, about a Jewish girl who had to leave Russia in 1919, but becomes separated from her family at Ellis Island. In the book Rifka writes journal entries about what is happening in her life and on her journey. This book opened up the world for me; I remember for the first time feeling empathy for a character’s struggles, interest in history, and the cultures of people who were different from me. I would love to buy a copy of this book to read again as an adult and give to my kids to read someday!

Then came Harry Potter and Hogwarts. Like every 90’s kid, I was drawn into the Sorcerer’s Stone in my fourth grade year. The characters were the same age as I was at the time, making the story all that much more compelling and relatable. As a lonely child who was the new kid in school for the second time in a year, I was drawn into Harry’s story and felt myself wishing for my own letter of acceptance to Hogwarts and great friends like Ron and Hermione. Each year I anxiously looked forward to the release of the next book in the series and would spend the day (sometimes two) locked in my room reading, annoyed by any interruption, even the interruption of meal-time. The final book came out the summer before my senior year of high school. Like many of my fellow Potterheads, I rushed to my local store at midnight with my little brother in tow to buy a copy of The Deathly Hallows. The series and characters grew with me, and will always hold such a special place in my heart.  And, I’m still waiting for my Hogwarts letter to come – hint, hint.  Continue reading “My History of Reading – Ashley”

The Perfect Stranger – Review

I think I may have been at an advantage reading The Perfect Stranger as my first Megan Miranda book. The reviews for All the Missing Girls are raving, making fans wonder if The Perfect Stranger can live up to the hype. Since I have yet to read her previous works, I have no comparisons to effect my judgment. Ignorance is bliss in this case.

After a mysterious fiasco with her journalism career, Leah is forced to start over in a new place (Western Pennsylvania) with her long-time friend, Emmy, and in a new career as a teacher. When a girl is found by the lake near the girls’ house barely hanging onto life, Leah’s plans for a slower paced life are put on hold. Her journalistic instincts take hold, and she begins investigating the story. Shortly after, Leah realizes her flighty roommate hasn’t been home or seen for a few days and begins to worry she may be the subject of a similar vicious attack. Continue reading “The Perfect Stranger – Review”

The Language of Dying – Review

I would say this book is short and sweet, but there is nothing sweet about the bitter end of a life, sitting in a bed counting down the minutes.  Instead, I can say this short book was an honest look at what happens to families when the glue that holds them together is crumbling away.  In this case, the patriarch of the family is dying as his sons and daughters come together for his last moments on Earth. The family dynamic is challenged, the roles each sibling plays in the care of their father are not clearly defined, and the characters struggle through a situation no one knows how to properly handle.

“Even when by rights it has no place left to be, love is hard to kill.”

This was my first Sarah Pinborough book, though I want to read Behind Her Eyes, and it was right up my alley.  I love books that break apart the human psyche as it is challenged with different trials. Death is the ultimate trial, and most authors tend to shy away from discussing the topic at depth.  I love that Sarah tackled the subject, making such a bleak topic the center of her entire book without creating an incredibly depressing story.  She instead focused on the ties that bind us. Continue reading “The Language of Dying – Review”