The Perfect Stranger – Review

I think I may have been at an advantage reading The Perfect Stranger as my first Megan Miranda book. The reviews for All the Missing Girls are raving, making fans wonder if The Perfect Stranger can live up to the hype. Since I have yet to read her previous works, I have no comparisons to effect my judgment. Ignorance is bliss in this case.

After a mysterious fiasco with her journalism career, Leah is forced to start over in a new place (Western Pennsylvania) with her long-time friend, Emmy, and in a new career as a teacher. When a girl is found by the lake near the girls’ house barely hanging onto life, Leah’s plans for a slower paced life are put on hold. Her journalistic instincts take hold, and she begins investigating the story. Shortly after, Leah realizes her flighty roommate hasn’t been home or seen for a few days and begins to worry she may be the subject of a similar vicious attack. Continue reading “The Perfect Stranger – Review”

The Language of Dying – Review

I would say this book is short and sweet, but there is nothing sweet about the bitter end of a life, sitting in a bed counting down the minutes.  Instead, I can say this short book was an honest look at what happens to families when the glue that holds them together is crumbling away.  In this case, the patriarch of the family is dying as his sons and daughters come together for his last moments on Earth. The family dynamic is challenged, the roles each sibling plays in the care of their father are not clearly defined, and the characters struggle through a situation no one knows how to properly handle.

“Even when by rights it has no place left to be, love is hard to kill.”

This was my first Sarah Pinborough book, though I want to read Behind Her Eyes, and it was right up my alley.  I love books that break apart the human psyche as it is challenged with different trials. Death is the ultimate trial, and most authors tend to shy away from discussing the topic at depth.  I love that Sarah tackled the subject, making such a bleak topic the center of her entire book without creating an incredibly depressing story.  She instead focused on the ties that bind us. Continue reading “The Language of Dying – Review”

The Bronze Horseman – Review

I finally read The Bronze Horseman, people! That’s enough for a celebration in itself since it has been sitting on my Kindle app for almost a year now! Everyone raves about this book and I just knew I was going to love it intensely. You guys know how much I love a good World War II story. There’s a little part of me that is always anxious to read what I know will be an amazing book because I know I will only get to experience it for the first time, well, the first time. It’s incredible to fully live inside the pages of a book that one loves, but the pain of it being over is sometimes so devastating. It’s like having a friend move to the other side of the world to my empathetic brain. I don’t want to say goodbye. Luckily I have two more books to get me through my sorrows…at least until they are over. Continue reading “The Bronze Horseman – Review”

The Gravity of Us – Review

Let me start by saying, whatever I write about this book will not be able to do it justice. Last year I was gifted a copy of The Air He Breathes by a lovely person in Colleen Hoover’s CoHorts. I subsequently devoured the novel, along with all of the other books in Brittainy C. Cherry’s Elements Series. Each book was better than the last. Any author that can invoke such deep emotions within me is an author I am going to stick with and read as long as they keep writing.

The Gravity of Us is not an exception and became my favorite of this series a quarter of the way through the book. Graham has to be one of the best male leads in a story. He is deep, angry, and downright mean in the beginning. But, as we learn more about Graham’s past, readers come to understand his guarded personality. Lucy was the light of this book with her carefree spirit and the love she showed to those around her. Continue reading “The Gravity of Us – Review”

Saving Tatum – Review

Tatum CoverAs I mentioned in my previous review, Tempting Rowan and Saving Tatum are my favorite books in the “Trace + Olivia” series by Micalea Smeltzer. Although completely different regarding the plot, they still have some similarities. As the other books in this series, I read Saving Tatum about 2 years ago but I didn’t know how much I missed both Jude and Tatum until I picked up the book again.
Tatum and Jude have a past – but not the one you’re thinking of. Jude is the reason for Tatum’s sadness and her reservation toward people. He is also the reason her parents don’t care for her anymore. So why would she give him the time of day when he clearly ruined her life? She is determined to stay away from Jude and his advances at all costs. But Jude has other plans. He wants to get to the bottom of her hatred toward him and wants to make her like him and see the real Jude. Continue reading “Saving Tatum – Review”

Mists of the Serengeti – Review

mistsMists of the Serengeti is not the typical book I would ditch my TBR pile for. However, after a friend gifted me this book and I saw the overwhelming number of positive reviews, I decided to jump in.  This book had everything I look for in a story– beautiful writing, plenty of emotions, educational moments, and love!  What more could a girl ask for?

“…we’re all connected in strange, mysterious ways.  Pull a thread here and a life unravels there.”

Normally, I find stories set in Africa outside of my realm of interest.  I’ve never been very inspired by African culture, environment, or history.  I’m happy to say, Mists of the Serengeti broadened my horizons in ways I wasn’t prepared for.  First, this novel completely caught me off guard by featuring albinism.  The strangest coincidence happened the day I started reading this book.  I was watching television with my husband and he pointed out an Albino basketball player in one of the games he was watching.  Later in the afternoon, he switched it to an episode of Cops (yes, interesting TV choices that day) where one of the police officers was an Albino man.  While I have personally seen a couple of people with albinism in my life, I had never given the condition much thought.  I started wondering what struggles people of African decent may face if their skin is white, and decided to start my own research. At this point, I had yet to reach the description of Scholastica walking out of the shadows in the story    my jaw was on the floor when I read it.  What are the chances of randomly seeing two people with albinism on TV, being curious about it and researching the subject, and then reading about it in a book all in the same day?  It’s not as if this is an everyday topic many of us come face-to-face with.  This odd bit of Kismet had me drawn to the story in an unforgettable way. Continue reading “Mists of the Serengeti – Review”

God-Shaped Hole – Review

When Tarryn Fisher recommends a book, I read it, like a good little sheeple should. I’ve had God-Shaped Hole on my TBR for a while, but when I saw Tarryn and Tiffanie’s live Facebook video a couple of weeks ago I bought it, finally.
Now let me start by saying, I cannot give this book a star-rating. It doesn’t feel right for this book because of Jacob:

“He believed that any work an artist puts forth which contains the truth as he or she sees it is worthy of consideration, and any commentary of the work beyond that is nothing more than pure individual opinion and should not be considered relevant to the work itself.”

With that said, let me give my irrelevant opinion. Going in, I didn’t know what to expect since I rarely read blurbs or reviews prior to reading a book. The prelude gives us an idea of what may be to come, but even with this knowledge the story still has the ability to rip readers’ hearts and guts out and stomp all over them. I will not be recovering from this book for ages, and I mean that in the best way possible.  God-Shaped Hole is funny, smart, and heartbreakingly real. I’ve never read a love story that felt as realistic as this one. Beatrice and Jacob’s relationship wasn’t the perfection that is often depicted in most contemporary books. Their arguments were how they play out for real couples    full of pride and pettiness.  Their character traits made them seem like people I know. I loved how at times, Beatrice wanted to give in to end a stand-off, but her pride wouldn’t let her.  How many times do we as humans want to say, “I love you, you idiot. Let’s be happy again,” but our egos get in the way?  Beatrice was a girl after my own heart, with her genuine personality and hate of materialistic people and the culture of Los Angeles.  I remember going on vacation to California and being most excited to visit LA, then feeling ridiculously let down afterwards. What is with all of the hype? San Francisco, on the other hand, is where it’s at. Continue reading “God-Shaped Hole – Review”