Wait for It – Review

Wait for ItOne of the hardest things to do as a book blogger is to read an entire (670 page) book and give it a low-star review, especially when nearly half of Goodreads readers gave it the full 5 stars. Be warned, dear readers, I have an unpopular opinion ahead. Please don’t grab your torches and pitchforks.

Wait for It was the first Mariana Zapata book I have picked up. I knew about her high ratings, her hardcore fans, and her slow-burn romance style. All of these elements factored in to me choosing to read Wait for It, as it had been sitting on my TBR list for around a year. I needed a break from my current read and was looking for something I was bound to love. Unfortunately, Wait for It didn’t do it for me, as much as I wanted it to. I waited for it…I waited for the story to get rolling, I waited for the writing to get better, and I felt like it took until the last pages of this long book to improve incrementally.

Wait for It features the life of Diana, a young woman who inherited her nephews after the death of their parents, one being Diana’s brother. Diana is finally getting her life sorted out after such an unexpected and heartbreaking disruption, by moving into a new neighborhood. When Diana hears a fight happening outside of her new home, she decides to help out and break it up. The ungrateful recipient of Diana’s help is the younger brother of Diana’s new neighbor, Dallas. Eventually Diana and Dallas develop a friendship, which eventually grows into a deeper relationship.
Continue reading “Wait for It – Review”

Our Dream Reading Space

What would you say about your very own reading space and your very own library in your apartment/house? A place that only belongs to you. A place where you can give your favorite books a home and rearrange them by color, author or genre. Your own safe haven to read, relax and dream. Have you ever thought about such a place? What would it look like? With the help of Pinterest and the Arhaus living room collection, we decided to bring you our individual visions for the perfect reading nook.
Arhaus was founded in 1986 with a passion to provide unique, high quality, well designed home furnishings. Their philosophy was to design their own products, search for the best manufacturer while controlling quality, and bring the furniture direct to their customers. Their product developers travel the globe working directly with skilled artisans to craft pieces that can only be found at Arhaus, ensuring that every Arhaus piece meets their high quality standards.

images-arh-header Continue reading “Our Dream Reading Space”

One True Loves – Review

I’m not going to review this novel in the “proper” way. Instead, I want to tell you what it meant to me.

You see, I only read the first couple sentences of a blurb, if at all. I judge by popularity, the cover, genre, the author, all of the things readers aren’t supposed to judge a book by before reading it. Usually if it is popular, it is popular for a reason.

This makes me think of the quote, “if you read what everyone else is reading, you’ll think what everyone else is thinking.”

Alas, I have found a book that makes me disagree with this quote. If a book makes you think, it doesn’t matter what others people’s thoughts on it were. The only thing that matters are the thoughts you take away.

And, did I take away some thoughts. Continue reading “One True Loves – Review”

Atheists Who Kneel and Pray by Tarryn Fisher – Cover Reveal

Atheists.jpgTitle:  Atheists Who Kneel and Pray
Release Date:  TBD
Cover Design:  Ellie McLove of Love N. Books
Synopsis:
Yara Phillips is a wandering muse.
She dates men who need her, but always moves on to something new, never staying in one place for very long.
David Lisey is in need of a muse.
A talented musician lacking lyrical inspiration. When he first sees her, he knows he’s found what he’s been looking for.
Yara believes she can give David exactly what he needs to reach his full potential: A broken heart.
David’s religion is love.
Yara’s religion is heartache.
Neither is willing to surrender, but religion always requires sacrifice.Atheistssleeve.jpg

Are y’all freaking out like I am??? I can barely contain my excitement over this!  The title, the cover, the blurb, the TARRYN!! I love the anticipation of waiting for a new Tarryn Fisher release. Leave your guesses for the release date in the comments!!


Jumping around excitedly,

♥ Ashley

The Queen and the Cure – Review

“The Gifts we are given are not given for our benefit but for the benefit of mankind.”

Was Amy speaking of herself with this quote?  Seriously, the woman’s gift of writing is a benefit for mankind.  Every time I read one of her books I am in complete awe of her writing abilities.  She crafts such in depth stories and some of the most romantic scenes I have ever read.  To be honest, I’m not the biggest fantasy fan, but that does not stop me from snatching up Amy’s books as soon as they are released.  Whether I prefer the genre or not, I know I will be getting a beautiful story with some of the most incredible writing out there.  The Bird and the Sword was one of my favorite reads of 2016.

The Queen and the Cure picks up two years later where The Bird and the Sword left off, with Kjell’s story.

SYNOPSIS:

Kjell of Jeru had always known who he was. He’d never envied his brother or wanted to be king. He was the bastard son of the late King Zoltev and a servant girl, and the ignominy of his birth had never bothered him.

But there is more to a man than his parentage. More to a man than his blade, his size, or his skills, and all that Kjell once knew has shifted and changed. He is no longer simply Kjell of Jeru, a warrior defending the crown. Now he is a healer, one of the Gifted, and a man completely at odds with his power.

Called upon to rid the country of the last vestiges of the Volgar, Kjell stumbles upon a woman who has troubling glimpses of the future and no memory of the past. Armed with his unwanted gift and haunted by regret, Kjell becomes a reluctant savior, beset by old enemies and new expectations. With the woman by his side, Kjell embarks upon a journey where the greatest test may be finding the man she believes him to be.

Continue reading “The Queen and the Cure – Review”

My History of Reading – Ashley

I remember the very first book I read by myself as a kid. I don’t recall the title, but I can still see the illustrations in my mind’s eye – clocks and animals with simple words. I read that book nothing short of a thousand times, feeling so proud of myself each time because I was able to read the book on my own. From the moment I could read by myself, I was hooked. Little did I know how much reading would mean to me as I aged. As an independent person, my ability to read is paramount to me learning new things about cooking, building objects, or simply to satisfy my curiosity on a certain subject.

Before I was able to read to myself, the best days were when teachers would read the Amelia Bedelia books, because they were hilarious to me. I loved seeing how Amelia would confuse things. The Frog and Toad books also filled me with much excitement. I enjoy reading them to my own children now.

Some of my favorite novels to read as a kid were those in a series, such as The Boxcar Children, Nancy Drew, Goosebumps, and The Baby-Sitters Club. I was always rushing off to the town or school libraries to check out the next book in the series, and read countless numbers of these books.

My favorite standalone book from childhood was a book I read in third grade, called Letters From Rifka by Karen Hesse, about a Jewish girl who had to leave Russia in 1919, but becomes separated from her family at Ellis Island. In the book Rifka writes journal entries about what is happening in her life and on her journey. This book opened up the world for me; I remember for the first time feeling empathy for a character’s struggles, interest in history, and the cultures of people who were different from me. I would love to buy a copy of this book to read again as an adult and give to my kids to read someday!

Then came Harry Potter and Hogwarts. Like every 90’s kid, I was drawn into the Sorcerer’s Stone in my fourth grade year. The characters were the same age as I was at the time, making the story all that much more compelling and relatable. As a lonely child who was the new kid in school for the second time in a year, I was drawn into Harry’s story and felt myself wishing for my own letter of acceptance to Hogwarts and great friends like Ron and Hermione. Each year I anxiously looked forward to the release of the next book in the series and would spend the day (sometimes two) locked in my room reading, annoyed by any interruption, even the interruption of meal-time. The final book came out the summer before my senior year of high school. Like many of my fellow Potterheads, I rushed to my local store at midnight with my little brother in tow to buy a copy of The Deathly Hallows. The series and characters grew with me, and will always hold such a special place in my heart.  And, I’m still waiting for my Hogwarts letter to come – hint, hint.  Continue reading “My History of Reading – Ashley”

The Gravity of Us – Review

Let me start by saying, whatever I write about this book will not be able to do it justice. Last year I was gifted a copy of The Air He Breathes by a lovely person in Colleen Hoover’s CoHorts. I subsequently devoured the novel, along with all of the other books in Brittainy C. Cherry’s Elements Series. Each book was better than the last. Any author that can invoke such deep emotions within me is an author I am going to stick with and read as long as they keep writing.

The Gravity of Us is not an exception and became my favorite of this series a quarter of the way through the book. Graham has to be one of the best male leads in a story. He is deep, angry, and downright mean in the beginning. But, as we learn more about Graham’s past, readers come to understand his guarded personality. Lucy was the light of this book with her carefree spirit and the love she showed to those around her. Continue reading “The Gravity of Us – Review”