Wait for Me – Review

You all know by now how I love World War II novels, especially historical romance. When I saw Wait for Me on Instagram a few months ago, I knew I had to give it a try. I had never before read a YA historical romance, so I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. I mostly hoped it would not be a cheesy rendition of a love story.

Lorna Anderson is a young Scottish girl who helps with a variety of things on her father’s farm after her brothers leave for the war. When a previously injured German prisoner of war is assigned to work on their farm, Lorna is disgusted. How is she expected to work alongside the enemy her brothers are fighting? As Lorna reluctantly begins working with Paul, she comes to see him as a human instead of an enemy.

While this book did not have a lot of the grittiness of the WWII novels I’m used to, it still gave an accurate depiction of war affecting every aspect of people’s way of life. The food and clothing rations would be a challenge for our spoiled society of today, which allows readers to experience some of the difficulty of the unfamiliar situations. Caroline Leech’s strongest attribute in this story is showing readers the humanity in war. Just because someone was from Germany, even fighting for Germany, did not mean they believed in the cause they were fighting for. Sometimes the “enemy’s” actions are based solely upon survival. In Paul’s case, he was simply another man fighting for his life. When people abandon their humanity to be cruel to the other side, they show that hate is the true enemy in the war and world.

Wait for Me would be a great introduction to the genre of historical romance for young readers. It is a clean novel, an easy read, and allows readers to experience some of the conflicting feelings many would have felt during wartime without overwhelming with too much of the gore and evil of the era.

While the story was not quite as polished as I would hope for, it was still a solid and endearing novel worth reading. I would give this book 3.5 stars for the execution, leaning more towards 4 stars for the message the story conveyed. Overall, it was an enjoyable read (luckily, not cheesy at all) I would recommend to lovers of YA and historical fiction.

FUN FACT: Caroline Leech is from Scotland, but currently resides in Texas. Such a small world! There are so many authors in my home state. 

Happy Reading,
♥Ashley

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One True Loves – Review

I’m not going to review this novel in the “proper” way. Instead, I want to tell you what it meant to me.

You see, I only read the first couple sentences of a blurb, if at all. I judge by popularity, the cover, genre, the author, all of the things readers aren’t supposed to judge a book by before reading it. Usually if it is popular, it is popular for a reason.

This makes me think of the quote, “if you read what everyone else is reading, you’ll think what everyone else is thinking.”

Alas, I have found a book that makes me disagree with this quote. If a book makes you think, it doesn’t matter what others people’s thoughts on it were. The only thing that matters are the thoughts you take away.

And, did I take away some thoughts. Continue reading “One True Loves – Review”

The Queen and the Cure – Review

“The Gifts we are given are not given for our benefit but for the benefit of mankind.”

Was Amy speaking of herself with this quote?  Seriously, the woman’s gift of writing is a benefit for mankind.  Every time I read one of her books I am in complete awe of her writing abilities.  She crafts such in depth stories and some of the most romantic scenes I have ever read.  To be honest, I’m not the biggest fantasy fan, but that does not stop me from snatching up Amy’s books as soon as they are released.  Whether I prefer the genre or not, I know I will be getting a beautiful story with some of the most incredible writing out there.  The Bird and the Sword was one of my favorite reads of 2016.

The Queen and the Cure picks up two years later where The Bird and the Sword left off, with Kjell’s story.

SYNOPSIS:

Kjell of Jeru had always known who he was. He’d never envied his brother or wanted to be king. He was the bastard son of the late King Zoltev and a servant girl, and the ignominy of his birth had never bothered him.

But there is more to a man than his parentage. More to a man than his blade, his size, or his skills, and all that Kjell once knew has shifted and changed. He is no longer simply Kjell of Jeru, a warrior defending the crown. Now he is a healer, one of the Gifted, and a man completely at odds with his power.

Called upon to rid the country of the last vestiges of the Volgar, Kjell stumbles upon a woman who has troubling glimpses of the future and no memory of the past. Armed with his unwanted gift and haunted by regret, Kjell becomes a reluctant savior, beset by old enemies and new expectations. With the woman by his side, Kjell embarks upon a journey where the greatest test may be finding the man she believes him to be.

Continue reading “The Queen and the Cure – Review”

It’s Always the Husband – Review

It’s Always the Husband was a page flippin’ contradiction for me. There were parts I loved and thought were clever and parts I hated. My feelings were similar to the traits and relationships of the characters themselves.
Aubrey, Kate, and Jenny come from different worlds, placed together as roommates in their first year of college. Looking forward to new starts and the best years of their lives, the trio forms an unlikely friendship despite the odds being against them. One girl is poor as dirt from the other side of the country, one is a middle class “townie” with high ambitions, and the other has friends in high places with the world bowing at her feet. The story switches perspectives from past perspective to present day, 20 years after the girls’ freshman year. It follows up with their married lives and their mysterious strained relationship from events happening in their early college days. As we delve into each character’s psyche at different times, we unearth new tidbits about their less than stellar friendship, despite the women still classifying themselves as best friends.  Continue reading “It’s Always the Husband – Review”

The Perfect Stranger – Review

I think I may have been at an advantage reading The Perfect Stranger as my first Megan Miranda book. The reviews for All the Missing Girls are raving, making fans wonder if The Perfect Stranger can live up to the hype. Since I have yet to read her previous works, I have no comparisons to effect my judgment. Ignorance is bliss in this case.

After a mysterious fiasco with her journalism career, Leah is forced to start over in a new place (Western Pennsylvania) with her long-time friend, Emmy, and in a new career as a teacher. When a girl is found by the lake near the girls’ house barely hanging onto life, Leah’s plans for a slower paced life are put on hold. Her journalistic instincts take hold, and she begins investigating the story. Shortly after, Leah realizes her flighty roommate hasn’t been home or seen for a few days and begins to worry she may be the subject of a similar vicious attack. Continue reading “The Perfect Stranger – Review”

Who Needs Air – Review

IMG_9781editedHow often have you read a book that made you genuinely happy? And I don’t mean a re-read of your favorite book, because, well, it is obvious that it makes you happy. I mean a new book. One that you were a little skeptic about at first because the blurb sounded too good to be true. A new book with a great plot, a little drama and the perfect ending. I’ve read a bunch of books so far this year, but only a few made me feel this way, and, minor issues aside, Who Needs Air was one of them.

Campbell Potter has good reason to be stressed: on top of organizing a big project for work, she has to deal with her ex-boyfriend August who only arrived back in town a few days ago. But not any ex-boyfriend, no: The love of her life, to be exact. THE love of her life who walked out on her five years ago. THE love of her life who wrote a book about their love story, published it and became a bestselling author. Now he is back in their hometown to overseeing the filming of  his bestseller as it is turned into a movie. But Cam made a promise to herself: the day August left five years ago was the ending of their story. There is no chance of a sequel. But August has different plans because he already started writing the conclusion to their epic love story. Continue reading “Who Needs Air – Review”

The Red Hunter – Review

My first book by Lisa Unger sucked me in and wouldn’t let me go. I’ve had Ink and Bone on my TBR, even planning to read it earlier this month, but didn’t have the time to start it. I’m thrilled I was able to begin with The Red Hunter instead. This book will be sticking with me for a long time.

The story begins with two separate plots, seemingly unrelated, and two women (Zoey and Claudia) who have both faced their own horrors. One uses her past to fuel her drive for revenge and the other finds strength in sharing her history with the world through her blog. As the women work to come to terms with their traumas in their individual ways, simultaneously trying to uncover mysteries buried years ago, their paths diverge, forcing them to face the good and evil of the world head on.

From the get-go of this story, I was blown away with Unger’s writing. Her fingers type gold. There are writers and there are storytellers, and Lisa Unger is gifted in both facets. This story is layered with past perspectives, present moments, and alternating point of views, all seamlessly woven together to allow readers to feel thrilled, empathetic and maybe even worried for what the characters will face next. If the alternating perspectives seem confusing in the beginning, have no fear, it will all make sense in the end. Continue reading “The Red Hunter – Review”