It’s Always the Husband – Review

It’s Always the Husband was a page flippin’ contradiction for me. There were parts I loved and thought were clever and parts I hated. My feelings were similar to the traits and relationships of the characters themselves.
Aubrey, Kate, and Jenny come from different worlds, placed together as roommates in their first year of college. Looking forward to new starts and the best years of their lives, the trio forms an unlikely friendship despite the odds being against them. One girl is poor as dirt from the other side of the country, one is a middle class “townie” with high ambitions, and the other has friends in high places with the world bowing at her feet. The story switches perspectives from past perspective to present day, 20 years after the girls’ freshman year. It follows up with their married lives and their mysterious strained relationship from events happening in their early college days. As we delve into each character’s psyche at different times, we unearth new tidbits about their less than stellar friendship, despite the women still classifying themselves as best friends.  Continue reading “It’s Always the Husband – Review”

The Perfect Stranger – Review

I think I may have been at an advantage reading The Perfect Stranger as my first Megan Miranda book. The reviews for All the Missing Girls are raving, making fans wonder if The Perfect Stranger can live up to the hype. Since I have yet to read her previous works, I have no comparisons to effect my judgment. Ignorance is bliss in this case.

After a mysterious fiasco with her journalism career, Leah is forced to start over in a new place (Western Pennsylvania) with her long-time friend, Emmy, and in a new career as a teacher. When a girl is found by the lake near the girls’ house barely hanging onto life, Leah’s plans for a slower paced life are put on hold. Her journalistic instincts take hold, and she begins investigating the story. Shortly after, Leah realizes her flighty roommate hasn’t been home or seen for a few days and begins to worry she may be the subject of a similar vicious attack. Continue reading “The Perfect Stranger – Review”

April Recap

april recap
Hello book lovers and happy May!
How have you been the past month? Since March was such a slow reading and reviewing month for us, we were very happy that April was the total opposite. Besides reading and reviewing books from our ever growing TBR, we were able to review a few ARCs as well as our first two NetGalley books! Yay! In case you’ve missed a few reviews, here are the links once again for you to catch up:

And here is a list of our reads and hopeful reviews in May:
The Summer Remains by Seth King, The Perfect Stranger by Megan Miranda, The Siren by Kiera Cass, The Queen and the Cure by Amy Harmon, Here’s to Tomorrow by Teagan Hunter, and Wait for Me by Caroline Leech.

Lots of bookish love,
♥ Ashley & Sabrina ♥

 

The Language of Dying – Review

I would say this book is short and sweet, but there is nothing sweet about the bitter end of a life, sitting in a bed counting down the minutes.  Instead, I can say this short book was an honest look at what happens to families when the glue that holds them together is crumbling away.  In this case, the patriarch of the family is dying as his sons and daughters come together for his last moments on Earth. The family dynamic is challenged, the roles each sibling plays in the care of their father are not clearly defined, and the characters struggle through a situation no one knows how to properly handle.

“Even when by rights it has no place left to be, love is hard to kill.”

This was my first Sarah Pinborough book, though I want to read Behind Her Eyes, and it was right up my alley.  I love books that break apart the human psyche as it is challenged with different trials. Death is the ultimate trial, and most authors tend to shy away from discussing the topic at depth.  I love that Sarah tackled the subject, making such a bleak topic the center of her entire book without creating an incredibly depressing story.  She instead focused on the ties that bind us. Continue reading “The Language of Dying – Review”

The Red Hunter – Review

My first book by Lisa Unger sucked me in and wouldn’t let me go. I’ve had Ink and Bone on my TBR, even planning to read it earlier this month, but didn’t have the time to start it. I’m thrilled I was able to begin with The Red Hunter instead. This book will be sticking with me for a long time.

The story begins with two separate plots, seemingly unrelated, and two women (Zoey and Claudia) who have both faced their own horrors. One uses her past to fuel her drive for revenge and the other finds strength in sharing her history with the world through her blog. As the women work to come to terms with their traumas in their individual ways, simultaneously trying to uncover mysteries buried years ago, their paths diverge, forcing them to face the good and evil of the world head on.

From the get-go of this story, I was blown away with Unger’s writing. Her fingers type gold. There are writers and there are storytellers, and Lisa Unger is gifted in both facets. This story is layered with past perspectives, present moments, and alternating point of views, all seamlessly woven together to allow readers to feel thrilled, empathetic and maybe even worried for what the characters will face next. If the alternating perspectives seem confusing in the beginning, have no fear, it will all make sense in the end. Continue reading “The Red Hunter – Review”